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My Blog

The Delicious Ingredients of a Literary Salon

THE DELICIOUS INGREDIENTS OF A
LITERARY SALON
 
First, take one stylish hostess, Anna Burnside, in fabulous wedges that she confides are the sensible alternative to her 'mad shoes,' and pink cropped trousers that match her kettle.
 
Throw in a bunch of mixed professionals, including journalists, social workers, a film producer and a gardener.
 
Stir in home made pea soup, runny soft Brie, countless nibbles and copious amounts of drink and conversation and you have the recipe for a splendid evening.
 
I'd never been to a literary salon before and was honoured to be invited to talk about my novel, Myra, Beyond Saddleworth, in the divine Ms Anna's elegant flat in the West End of Glasgow. Not being familiar with salons and how they're conducted, I was a bit flummoxed to be asked to do a reading but luckily I'd appeared at Glasgow's Aye Write Festival the week before and still had the print-out of the extract I'd chosen. I'd like to say it was forward thinking that led to its presence in my handbag, but alas it was blotched with either coffee or wine stains (my two staples) and had an email address scrawled on the back. I'm sure I'll remember soon why I was to contact the lady.
 
A literary salon, according to Wikipedia, 'is a gathering of people under the roof of an inspiring host, held partly to amuse one another and partly to refine the taste and increase the knowledge of the participants through conversation.' They've rather fallen out of fashion since their heyday in 18th century France but this is perhaps the moment for their revival, when the literati are mulling over the paradox that women are the main consumers of fiction, yet wield much less power than men. A recent breakdown of the gender balance of literary magazines showed an astonishing bias towards men, with a magazine such as the London Review of Books, for example, featuring 174 female book reviewers, authors reviewed and bylines compared to 574 male. No wonder Spare Rib is making a comeback.
 
The glittering French salons gave women the opportunity to shine. The most famous were run by fashionable hostesses famed for their erudition and brilliant conversation. Just like us Weegies really, though Ms Anna, the Glaswegian Mme de Staël, confessed that some colleagues at the magazine where she was working found her 'strong meat' because of her lack of inhibition in expressing her opinions. They clearly hadn't encountered the irrepressible Maggie Lennon, who was also there that night.
 
Anna eschewed the French tradition of lounging on her bed with her guests around her and instead brought out an eclectic collection of funky modern chairs. The other Jean Rafferty (Jean Bond Rafferty), an American who lives in Paris and whose invites to fashion shows I'm always receiving, would no doubt have been able to identify them. I just know they weren't IKEA.
 
It's an interesting process for writers to be in such an intimate setting with their readers. I've appeared at a couple of literary festivals and there's almost a protective veil between you and the audienceyou're on a platform, you have a chairperson to moderate. I know Ms Anna would have jumped in if things had got heated, but this was a more democratic forum. And there was wine!
 
'I was very stern with them,' she told me. 'I insisted they all had to read the book beforehand.'
 
The result was a group of people genuinely addressing the issues of the novelwhy did the Moors Murderers do it? why were they so reviled when subsequent serial killers have killed far more people? was their background enough to explain their actions?
 
 The group were, of course, all womenthey rather than men seem to have embraced the novel as an art form, perhaps because it doesn't require specialisation. In general women, no matter how elevated they become in their chosen profession, are still involved in the minutiae of domestic and family life. They're the ones who get off the red-eye from New York and still spoon yoghhurt into the kids or drive them into school. They never get too far from reality, so stories of human beings seem viscerally important to them in a way they don't seem to be with men.
 
Fiction ranges through every level of human activity, from philosophy to morality to passion to shoes. You can refract science or religion or love through its lens; you can use it to reflect on literary form or to reflect on eternity. That's what makes it such a useful vehicle for discussing big issues, the nature of reality.
 
And some small ones. Our inspiring hostess Anna Burnside led the discussion into unexpected areas, such as when did M take the wig* off after she met the priest who became her lover? And wasn't he hot? She also produced the most delicious banana bread which, like Proust's madeleine, stirred distant memoriesin my case, that of chewing a bar of banana split toffee and jumping over puddles after I'd got my pocket money.
 
The whole thing was a delightful experience and I look forward to the next one, which will feature a male writer whose name Anna would not disclose. That's the other ingredient of the successful literary salon, a pinch of spiceand that Ms A has in abundance.    
 
                                   **************                          
 
 
* M didn't sleep with the priest at their first meeting. The next time they met she brazened it out and turned up with her normal brown hair. He, being a hot male, wasn't looking that far north anyway.
** Men and haircuts: they're dimly aware you've changed something but they're not sure what.

5 Comments to The Delicious Ingredients of a Literary Salon:

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Rachael on 09 May 2013 01:12
Flippin' 'eck! Stanley Unwin rides again... Care to provide a translation?!?
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Rachael on 09 May 2013 17:44
...your descriptions are conjuring images of a latter day Ottoline Morrell... and the Moroccan lunches of Jane Bowles, where she eschewed the company of her husband in favour of a passing muezzin... while reclining on canopied beds, imbibing copious quantities of medaillon... hmmm, now replace that image with a studio flat in South Manchester, and a half bottle of Sauvignon Blanc... oh would that it were! I'd love to think that the idea of literary salons could take off - a perfect antidote to the drudgery of social media. I recently left a book group because it was becoming too uniform... and the reading list was leaning away from the esoteric and more toward the Richard and Judy variety ... not really my bag! Could you start a trend Jean? Authors for hire? I can't promise an Eames lounger, but I've recently remodelled a very comfy rocking chair! Great piece btw!
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Jean Rafferty on 16 May 2013 16:08
Thanks very much for your comments. The whole thing was great fun - Anna and myself would relish the canopied beds and medallion! Pity you're in Manchester because you sound like a literary salon type of person. I agree with you about book groups. When it'a the same people all the time it can become a bit safe. I don't think that will happen with Anna's salon. definitely


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